can Jason Lescalleet change the world?

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RFKorp
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Re: can Jason Lescalleet change the world?

Post by RFKorp »

negative potential wrote:
Steven Reynolds wrote: but as some know, I've listening to a bit of music over the year - and I don't want to hear about the *cause* - as it is certainly not my cause - so I am no choir.

[...]

but the *idea* that all the musicians playing free improvisation, EAI, avant-garde or whatever are preaching 'politically to the choir' is nauseating.
Steve, did it ever occur to you that attitudes like yours might actually be the reason why some artists feel obligated to make political statements in the first place, regardless of their lack of efficacy?
Just FYI. It goes both ways.
The grammatical rules associated with diagrammatic reduction become apparent by considering a more tractable diagrammatic representation, applied to the Windsor knot in Fig. 8. - Fink & Mao, Tie knots, random walks and topology, (Physica A 276)

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RFKorp
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Re: can Jason Lescalleet change the world?

Post by RFKorp »

faster wrote:
RFKorp wrote:Cage could only open people's ears to something because a large enough group of other people's ears were ready for it. Same for whomever you want to mention.
The idea that "ears are more open now" strikes me as seductive but false. Could you possibly have, in addition to the ears you have for today's experimental and pop music, the same ears for whatever people listened to in 1910 as people back then did? Sure, you may hear stuff as music that people back then may not have been able to enjoy/appreciate, but I think the same goes the other way to some extent. I can hear a baroque allemande or a bebop solo "as music," but no way do I have the ears for it that someone raised on it, dancing to it, inhabiting its atmosphere and cultural context, would have had. There's a smug sense of triumphalism in this teleological (Whig?) view of history as a "progression" leading to something, that doesn't sit well with me; if it's true, after all, what it's led to is us, which makes us a culmination. And I don't buy that.

(I'm not arguing for stasis or equivalence, just to be clear. I just suspect the changes that happen over time are far more haphazard and lossy than you're assuming.)
I didn't mean to imply we were on a direct or even positive trajectory. just that cultural expectations are always moving somewhere and in moments of art/music/etc history that have contributed directly/indirectly/chaotically toward the way things are today, things stuck (or didn't) because conditions were (at least momentarily) appropriate to cause whatever response ensued.
The grammatical rules associated with diagrammatic reduction become apparent by considering a more tractable diagrammatic representation, applied to the Windsor knot in Fig. 8. - Fink & Mao, Tie knots, random walks and topology, (Physica A 276)

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Seth
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Re: can Jason Lescalleet change the world?

Post by Seth »

faster wrote:
Seth wrote:I think musicians often have heartfelt political positions because they often don't have much money, which makes them more likely to care about what is done to them by others. Quite often the reason they don't have much money is related to them pursuing music, and there's a certain amount of guilt or anxiety that arises from pursuing the latter at the expense of the former. It makes sense to want to direct that anxiety into activism; it also makes sense that musicians might find the displacement activity of pseudo-activism through music pretty seductive. It maintains all the benefits of being a fulltime musician without putting them or their spare time at risk through real political activity, while giving them the sense that they're engaged and 'doing something.' It's not hard to see why people link these things, which is why it's valuable when people see through it and resist trying to tie things up with a neat musicotheological bow.
Yeah, some truth to this. And some cynicism.
I was raised Charismatic Evangelical - lots of people in small rooms of safely like minded people trying to change the world by shouting at their god. Then I met loads of occultists - lots of unemployed individuals alone in their bedsits trying to change the world by wanking over sigils. Then there were the two NLP courses - a hundred people in a room trying to change the world by applying techniques slavishly to the letter, often out of context. And now there's working for the emergency services - whole counties full of people trying to change the world with a single 999 call.

And now there's this thread. Sorry if I'm coming across as cynical. I genuinely try my hardest not to be.

max
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Re: can Jason Lescalleet change the world?

Post by max »

Revision

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lukaz
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Re: can Jason Lescalleet change the world?

Post by lukaz »

Metamkine is selling this for all the lost souls in the world who would like to be saved ...

Graham LAMBKIN / Jason LESCALLEET, "The Food Chain" / "Nice Ass"

Limited copies of this UK tour only split 7" - edition of 300 copies only.

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jon abbey
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Re: can Jason Lescalleet change the world?

Post by jon abbey »

I have a handful left too, nice release.

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misengarde
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Re: can Jason Lescalleet change the world?

Post by misengarde »

yes, very nice release.
i'm into "il turista" right now.

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jliat
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Re: can Jason Lescalleet change the world?

Post by jliat »

If a butterfly can I don’t see why Jason Lescalleet can’t?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butterfly_effect

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